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I was once asked this question about Noahides who attend a Rosh HaShanah synagogue service:

"If a Noahide man goes to shul for the Rosh HaShanah morning service, should he kneel and bow his head down to the floor along with the congregation during their repetition of the Amidah prayer? What about a Noahide woman?"

My answer was, why not? As long as their mind with it is on G-d.
Is there anything a Noahide may do for Rosh Hoshanah or Yom Kippur?
Yes! For example, please refer to these audio clips (MP3 files):

https://asknoah.org/audio/holidays-for-noahides-july4

https://asknoah.org/audio/mitzvos-for-gentiles

https://asknoah.org/audio/rosh-hashanah-the-new-year

https://asknoah.org/audio/understanding-...gogue-shul

https://asknoah.org/audio/yom-kippur-in-the-holy-temple

You can also refer to these pages on our web site:

https://asknoah.org/essay/rosh-hashanah-...f-creation

https://asknoah.org/faq/noahide-prayers-...h-hashanah

Noahide Prayer: https://asknoah.org/faqs?cat=79

https://asknoah.org/essay/noahide-holidays

https://asknoah.org/faq/going_beyond

There is also the custom to recite many Psalms during the days of Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur, which can certainly be done by Noahides. Also a Noahide can read the portions of the Torah and the Prophets which are specially designated for Jews to read on these days.

Best regards,

Director Michael
Dr. Michael,

The book of Jubilees, although non-canonical, seems to put down a more ancient Noahide code than that expressed in the Talmud. The community at the Dead Sea studied Jubilees.

The code in the book of Jubilees advocates keeping the four new moon celebrations in the year immediately following the solstices and equinoxes, (which commemorate the four major points of the Flood narrative.)

Since new moon celebrations are not new holidays but are ancient ones, is there anything wrong with dedicating four new moons a year to commerate the Flood? or to celebrate the passing of seasons?

G-d bless,
Brian
The book of Jubilees was a novel work of non-scriptural, non-prophetic literature that was composed about 100 years before the destruction of the Second Temple. Whatever it's author might have suggested, no matter how well-intentioned, does not override or impact on any point of Mosaic law. The relevant foundational principle is that a Gentile is not allowed to create a new (i.e. a man-made) religion or any new commandments.

From "The Divine Code," 2nd Edition, by Rabbi Moshe Weiner (p. 66-67):

"if a Gentile abstains from weekday activities and makes a sabbath for himself, even on a weekday, he is liable [for making a new religion or adding a new commandment]. This obviously includes one who establishes a 'holy day' for himself that is similar to the holy days and Sabbaths of the Jews, which are religious holidays (i.e. 'a holy assembly' day, during which he prohibits himself from work), since this is creating for himself a new religion. Not only is taking on a sabbath day forbidden, but even the setting aside of any day for a specific religious observance or statute, such as one who establishes for himself a time to eat a special food as a precept (e.g., eating unleavened bread on Passover), or to fast on a specific day (e.g., the Jewish fast day of Yom Kippur), and the like. Even if he did not also set it aside as a sabbath or festival day (i.e., for refraining from work), this is considered as creating a festival and a religion from his own comprehension. However, if he sets up for himself a day of rest from work, not as a holiday but just as a break from work, it is permissible, for he is not establishing it as a religious precept from his own comprehension... But if a Gentile wants to eat unleavened bread or sit in a sukkah booth for his pleasure (e.g., if he likes eating unleavened bread, or sitting in a sukkah booth because of the heat of the day), he is allowed to. This is so even during the Jewish holy days, since he does not intend at all to observe the Jewish commandment, but he does the action only for his own satisfaction, and he is not establishing a festival for himself."

Participating in annual secular activities and commem­orating historical events (for example, a national independence day), even if they involve a festive meal, are certainly permissible.
Hello,

I know this has been discussed but i need an answer ASAP.

I am currently in Jerusalem and i would like to attend the Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur services, but i would like to know is there anything besides completing the full fast that i should not do. Mostly this question is in regards to Prayers: am i allowed to just follow along with everyone else?

Thank you,

Alex.
As a Noahide, here are some guidelines for the Jewish Biblical festivals:

1) In general, do not specifically intend to be observing any of the Jewish restrictions on activities during the festivals. You can continue your normal types of activities that would be forbidden for Jews (using electricity, driving, writing, etc.)

2) Do not say a benediction of sanctifying the festival day (i.e. saying "kiddush" at a meal).

3) Do not actively perform any of the special Jewish festival commandments with the intention that you are observing a Divine commandment (e.g. blowing a ram's horn on Rosh HaShanah, fasting on Yom Kippur).

4) In the synagogue, do not get called up to the Torah scroll during the public reading.

5) A Gentile can't be counted in the minimum of 10 Jewish men who are needed for a communal prayer-service quorum (a minyan).

6) You can follow along in the Orthodox Jewish prayer book during the services, but don't recite those parts that apply exclusively to Jews. Gentiles may bow down to the floor in prayer while the the congregation does so during the Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur services.

7) Don't forget to turn off your cell phone or pager during the synagogue prayer services.

8) If attending a synagogue service, a Gentile women should dress modestly. And for respect of the congregation, a man should wear a hat or a yarmulke (Jewish skull cap).
(09-28-2011 10:57 AM)Director Michael Wrote: [ -> ]As a Noahide, here are some guidelines for the Jewish Biblical festivals:

[...]
6) You can follow along in the Orthodox Jewish prayer book during the services, but don't recite those parts that apply exclusively to Jews. Gentiles may bow down to the floor in prayer while the the congregation does so during the Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur services.

How will we know which portions that apply exclusively to Jews? It is my experience that since a Siddur is (almost always) designed for Jews, they (almost) never specify which portions are for Jews alone. [They may, however, denote which words are specifically for a Levite or a Cohen]. As a possible (temporary) fix to the 'problem', can one omit words or phrases (even at random) so that we are NOT reciting the (complete) prayer as would a Jew?
> How will we know which portions that apply exclusively to Jews?

It is sufficient for a Noahide to simply read ahead in the translation that's printed in an Orthodox Jewish prayer book, paragraph by paragraph or a few lines at a time, without saying the words. If the passage is expressing something that logically only applies to Jews, the Noahide should skip over it without reciting that part verbally. If it is expressing something that logically does apply to Noahides, the Noahide may say it verbally as his/her own prayer to G-d. (Simply reading a piece of text in thought, without saying it verbally or intending it as a prayer, is not considered to be a prayer.)

> As a possible (temporary) fix to the 'problem', can one omit words or phrases (even at random) so that we are NOT reciting the (complete) prayer as would a Jew?

No, that would not be a proper approach. Just read a bit ahead silently, and choose the parts that are logically fitting for you to recite verbally as your own prayers.
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