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Hi Director Michael and Rabbis-
Regarding the post right before the last one in this section, I thought I'd heard Noahides aren't supposed to pray the whole Shema, which mentions the Jewish mitzvah of affixing a mezzuzah and so forth, Can we say the whole thing or just "Shema Israel, Hashem Elokeinu, Hashem Echad, Baruch Shem K'vod Malchuto l'olam va'ed"?
Which parts can we do, even if we are in a synagogue?
Thank you
An observant Noahide is allowed to read any of the verses of the Tanach (the Hebrew Bible). This means that an observant Noahide is also allowed to recite any of the verses of the Tanach. If you are reciting verses that have to do with Jewish commandments, you just need to have in mind that what you are speaking about is a Jewish commandment - such as the Jewish commandments of affixing a mezzuzah, or putting on tefilin, or loving G-d under all circumstances, etc., which are among those mentioned in the three paragraphs of the "Shema" prayer. A Noahide can draw inspiration and insight from Jewish commandments which are not incumbent on non-Jews, as long as he understands that he is not obligated (and in some cases not allowed) to observe them. The first verse you quoted speaks about G-d's Kingship over the entire creation and all created beings ["Hear, O Israel, the L-rd is our G-d, the L-rd is One" (Deut. 6:4)], and a Jew is required to recite this at least twice daily.
rabbiyitz Wrote:Shalom
The Hebrew letters of "amen," which are "alef - mem - nun," are also seen by our Sages as an acrostic hinting to the phrase "(K)e-l Melech Ne'eman" - "G-d, the faithful King."

Does that exact phrase ("[K]e-l Melech Ne'eman" - "G-d, the faithful King") appear in the text of the Torah or Haftorot anywhere?

I have taken the liberty of recording a cantor singing the passages contained in the Sh'ma, and have it on my MP3 player, first so that I may pray to HaShem whenever I feel the urge, and so that I have the ability to learn the exact pronunciation whenever I recite the Sh'ma.
I have been mentally inserting the phrase above, as well as "Boruch shem kavod malkhuto le'olam va'ed," in the appropriate place (after the first verse of "Sh'ma"). Does that phrase appear in the Torah?
Finally, should I NOT be doing what I have been?
Toda rabba.
Mattityahu ben Noach Wrote:Does that exact phrase ("[K]e-l Melech Ne'eman" - "G-d, the faithful King") appear in the text of the Torah or Haftorot anywhere?

So far I have not found that exact phrase in the Hebrew Bible. It appears in the Ashkenazic liturgy, immediately before the first paragraph of the "Sh'ma" verses.

However, see these two verses that separately use "faithful" and "King" with that specific Name of G-d in Hebrew:

Deuteronomy 7:9 - "You must know that the L-rd, your G-d - He is the G-d, the faithful G-d ..."

Psalms 68:25 - "They saw Your ways O G-d, the ways of my G-d, my King ..."

Mattityahu ben Noach Wrote:I have taken the liberty of recording a cantor singing the passages contained in the Sh'ma, and have it on my MP3 player, first so that I may pray to HaShem [G-d] whenever I feel the urge, and so that I have the ability to learn the exact pronunciation whenever I recite the Sh'ma.

It is permitted for an observant Noahide to pray by reciting verses from the Hebrew Bible in Hebrew, IF he understands what he is saying.
Otherwise, his studying and reciting of verses should be from a translation in a language he understands, as published or provided by a reliable Orthodox Jewish translator.

Mattityahu ben Noach Wrote:I have been mentally inserting the phrase above, as well as "Boruch shem kavod malkhuto le'olam va'ed," in the appropriate place (after the first verse of "Sh'ma").

If you're going to included them in your prayer, it's better if you say those two phrases quietly, instead of only mentally.

Mattityahu ben Noach Wrote:Does that phrase appear in the Torah?

It is found in the Talmud and the Midrash.

Mattityahu ben Noach Wrote:Finally, should I NOT be doing what I have been?

Again, it's OK to recite verses from the Hebrew Scriptures as prayers, and this can be in Hebrew if you understand what you're saying.
Thank you.
Yes, I understand what I am saying (mostly). I know the meanings of all the verses, and all but a few (perhaps five) of the individual words. But this has helped me get better at understanding.
You said they are used in the Ashkenazic service. I understand they do it to make the "Shema" paragraphs come out to a certain number of words. What do Sephardim say, if anything?
The Sephardic liturgy follows the same custom. But it is not universal to all of the traditional Jewish liturgies.

Joachim ben Noach

Director Michael in post 4:
"It is permitted for an observant Noahide to pray by reciting verses from the Hebrew Bible in Hebrew, IF he understands what he is saying.
Otherwise, his studying and reciting of verses should be from a translation in a language he understands, as published or provided by a reliable Orthodox Jewish translator."
___

So,
While learning psalms in Hebrew, may one pray them in Hebrew though one does not yet grasp the words? or should one learn the specific psalm completely first, meanwhile praying a translation?

Is it appropriate to look at the translation as one prays it in Hebrew, going phrase by phrase?
Joachim ben Noach Wrote:Director Michael in post 4:
"It is permitted for an observant Noahide to pray by reciting verses from the Hebrew Bible in Hebrew, IF he understands what he is saying.
Otherwise, his studying and reciting of verses should be from a translation in a language he understands, as published or provided by a reliable Orthodox Jewish translator."
___

So,
While learning psalms in Hebrew, may one pray them in Hebrew though one does not yet grasp the words? or should one learn the specific psalm completely first, meanwhile praying a translation?

Even an observant Noahide should pray in words that he/she understands, at least according to the traditional simple meaning of the words.

Joachim ben Noach Wrote:Is it appropriate to look at the translation as one prays it in Hebrew, going phrase by phrase?

That's OK, if you have in mind the meaning of the Hebrew words as you say them. If you are reading the Hebrew, you should be careful not to say the Tetragrammaton Name as it is spelled, but instead say one of the substitute names (for example, "HaShem").
I saw one Noahide group recommend replacing "Yisrael" with "Noach" in the Shema. Is this allowed, or could it be seen as misquoting Scripture?
Since this verse (Deuteronomy 6:4) is the source verse for one of the unique Jewish commandments (Positive Commandment #2 in Rambam's work "Sefer Ha'Mitzvot"), the deliberate misquote you've mentioned seems to effectively be an attempt to add on a "new" (i.e. man-made) spiritual obligation for Noahides, which is not allowed.

See "The Divine Code," Vol. 1, Part 1, ch. 3 (The Prohibition Against Making a New Religion or Adding a Commandment), by Rabbi Moshe Weiner:
https://asknoah.org/books/the-divine-code

On the other hand, it is a worthy and meritorious practice for a Gentile to make a verbal statement of his/her acceptance of G-d's Unity and Kingship, which could be one or more times per day.

To this end, Rabbi J. Immanuel Schochet has provided an exemplary statement that a Gentile can use for verbally accepting G-d’s Unity and Kingship, which includes correctly quoted verses from the Hebrew Scriptures. See the booklet* "Prayer, Blessings, Principles of Faith, and Divine Service for Noahides," by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Rabbi J. Immanuel Schochet, 6th Ed., pub. 20'14 Ask Noah International:

Almighty G-d, we accept upon ourselves that which is written in Your Torah: “You shall know this day and take to your heart that G-d [alone] is G-d, in the heavens above and on the earth below – there is none other!”[1] We affirm the precepts of “You shall love G-d, your G-d, with all your heart, and all your soul, and all your might;”[2] and “Fear G-d, your G-d, and serve Him, and in His Name [alone] shall you vow;”[3] and, as it says, “Fear G-d and keep His commandments, for that is a person’s entire duty.” [4]

[1] Deuteronomy 4:39.
[2] Ibid. 6:5.
[3] Ibid. 6:13.
[4] Ecclesiastes 12:13.


* https://asknoah.org/books/prayers-blessi...r-noahides
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