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How to can one observe only eating Jewish-certified kosher meat?
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(11-16-2017, 12:59 AM)Noahide Q Wrote: I would like to understand how this voluntary restriction could be put into practice considering the following:

1] A gentile is punishable for eating even the slightest amount of an edible part that was taken from a living land mammal or bird.

That only applies if he knows that the piece of meat was taken while the animal was still alive. If does not know, he does not transgress if he eats it. Here is what is written in "The Divine Code," Part IV, topic 6:8, by Rabbi Moshe Weiner of Jerusalem -

"A Gentile does not have a prohibition in cases of doubt. Therefore, a Gentile transgresses only if he definitely recognizes that aspect [of the action he's doing] that is forbidden. So, for example, if there is an unresolved doubt as to whether or not a piece of meat is 'eiver min hachai,' it is permitted for a Gentile to eat it."

(11-16-2017, 12:59 AM)Noahide Q Wrote: 2] Many general foods that are not labelled 'Kosher' will contain an amount of meat, or derived elements, that could possibly be forbidden as meat from a living land mammal or bird e.g. breads.

The rule I just quoted above applies to that issue. Also, see in the quoted source, topic 6:3 -

"If meat has been processed and changed to the extent that it is no longer considered a 'food,' there is no prohibition, because it is no longer related to a normal way of 'eating.' Therefore, if a piece of 'eiver min hachai' meat has been changed to the extent that it is no longer in the category of human food - for example, if it has been dried and made into powder that itself would not be eaten in a manner of food - the prohibition is removed."

(11-16-2017, 12:59 AM)Noahide Q Wrote: 3] A Gentile's utensils may retain slight amounts of meat that could possibly be forbidden as meat from a living land mammal or bird.

The above quoted rule about the permissibility of cases of doubt applies even more to that issue. Also, it is only the piece of meat itself that is forbidden, and not the blood or juices from the meat. The majority of authoritative Rabbinical opinions is that for Gentiles, if taste is absorbed into other food from forbidden meat, the other food is not forbidden. How much more is there no prohibition if it is just a left-over taste from the meat. In the above quoted source, see topic 6:6 -

"If, however, one cooked the meat and consumed the sauce, or squeezed out the juices from the meat and drank that, he is not liable. Similarly, if one cooked this meat together with other foods and the forbidden meat imparted a flavor to those foods, one is not liable for consuming the other foods. ...
It is nevertheless forbidden to deliberately [knowingly] cook or mix meat that was severed from a living land mammal or bird with other foods, for the purpose of then benefiting from the forbidden flesh [e.g., to benefit from the taste of that piece of flesh]."

See also the footnotes there.

(11-16-2017, 12:59 AM)Noahide Q Wrote: While a Gentile does not have a prohibition in cases of doubt, if a Gentile relies on this in relation to scenarios 2] & 3] how can they justify not relying on doubt in all cases?

Regarding "eiver min ha'chai" meat, a Gentile may rely on doubt in all cases that come to him by accident or happenstance. He is only forbidden to take a piece of meat that he knows is "eiver min ha'chai," and then deliberately use it to create a case of doubt, so that he can have some benefit or pleasure from that piece of meat. In the above quoted source, see topic 6:10.

(11-16-2017, 12:59 AM)Noahide Q Wrote: If a Gentile is going to voluntary restrict themselves to eating only kosher-certified meat, and thereby not rely upon doubt, then how could they carve out an exception for scenarios 2] & 3]? Shouldn't the Gentile either rely on doubt in all cases, or be as scrupulous as possible in all cases to avoid the possibility of eating meat from a living land mammal or bird?

Is it because we are still only talking about an entirely voluntary restriction, that the Gentile can be selective to what extent he/she reduces the possibility of eating meat from a living land mammal or bird.

It is because the commandment only applies to "eating meat" - which means taking a piece of meat and eating it in its normal form as normal food.

It is further prohibited (but not as a capital sin), for a Gentile to take a piece of meat that he knows is forbidden and use it in some way to derive a benefit or pleasure for himself. This includes a person who feeds it to someone else who doesn't know it's forbidden, if he gets a benefit or pleasure from giving it to that person.
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RE: How to can one observe only eating Jewish-certified kosher meat? - by Director Michael - 11-23-2017, 02:28 PM

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