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What is Considered to be Stealing?
12-30-2016, 08:58 PM (This post was last modified: 01-02-2017 03:48 PM by Director Michael.)
Post: #1
What is Considered to be Stealing?
Hello Rabbi(s),

Thank you for this fantastic forum!

I have a question about what constitutes stealing. I was staying at my brother's house and I used things without asking his or his wife's permission, for my own personal use (e.g. matches, sandwich spreads). I'm sure the answer would have been yes if I'd asked, but I just took things for my own personal use without thinking. Is that technically a violation of the commandment not to steal or is it OK?

Thank you!
Eve
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01-19-2017, 03:48 PM
Post: #2
RE: What is Considered to be Stealing?
Quoting from "The Divine Code." 2nd Edition, Part VII, topic 1:7 -
"It is also forbidden to steal from relatives or to take something of theirs without their knowledge, to use it without permission. This applies even if one knows with certainty that if his relative learned that he did this, the relative would be happy that he benefited in this way. As long as permission has not been given, this is forbidden as theft."

Therefore what you should do is speak with your brother or write to him, and mention that you remembered that while you were staying at his house, you used some things of his (e.g. matches, food items, ... - can you name the other things?) without realizing that you should have asked him first if it was OK. Now you want to apologize for that, and if there are any of those things you used that he wouldn't have given you permission to do so, he should please let you know, and you'll be happy to reimburse him for them.
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02-01-2017, 10:54 PM
Post: #3
RE: What is Considered to be Stealing?
(01-19-2017 03:48 PM)Director Michael Wrote:  Quoting from "The Divine Code." 2nd Edition, Part VII, topic 1:7 -
"It is also forbidden to steal from relatives or to take something of theirs without their knowledge, to use it without permission. This applies even if one knows with certainty that if his relative learned that he did this, the relative would be happy that he benefited in this way. As long as permission has not been given, this is forbidden as theft."

Therefore what you should do is speak with your brother or write to him, and mention that you remembered that while you were staying at his house, you used some things of his (e.g. matches, food items, ... - can you name the other things?) without realizing that you should have asked him first if it was OK. Now you want to apologize for that, and if there are any of those things you used that he wouldn't have given you permission to do so, he should please let you know, and you'll be happy to reimburse him for them.

Thank you for this detailed reply and instructions! I will definitely try to be more careful in future too.
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11-05-2017, 05:39 PM
Post: #4
RE: What is Considered to be Stealing?
Shalom!

Is inflation a form of stealing according to Noach's Law?
Please give personal opinion if the topic was not investigated.
http://www.investopedia.com/terms/p/purchasingpower.asp
Thanks!
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11-12-2017, 11:31 AM (This post was last modified: 11-12-2017 11:34 AM by Director Michael.)
Post: #5
RE: What is Considered to be Stealing?
Regarding fluctuations in the buying power of a nation's currency that result from economic circumstances, changing national conditions, and governmental economic policies, the Torah Sages treated inflation as a fact of life to be dealt with. The Torah Law principle that "the law of the land is the law" has limited scope, but it does include a nation's economic matters.

As such, the extensive Rabbinical writings that deal with the issues of inflation and currency devaluation are focused on the impact which they have over time upon monetary transactions between the citizens. For example, between people, it can impact on:

- payment of debts with a contracted fixed interest rate
- payment of debts that are contracted as interest-free
- using physical commodities that fluctuate in value as the means to pay debts
- delayed payment of contracted wages
- making restitution for a past theft, when it is no longer possible to return the stolen goods
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