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Aaron.Nanach

B"H

Shalom, I recall reading in the Rambam that Bnai Noah are not to create new holidays for themselves if I remember correctly. In light of this I am wondering whether it would ok for non Jews to celebrate Earth Day as it may fall into the category of a holiday, or perhaps this may be permissible.
Thanks
Aaron, it is my understanding that Gentiles are not to create Holy Days (religious holidays) for themselves. Such days as the 4th of July, Earth Day, etc which are not religious in nature would be alright as they are not devoted to a deity or deities. I am certain Dr. Schulman or one of the Rabbis can clarify this further.

Visit this link on the AskNoah web site for additional information: https://asknoah.org/essay/noahide-holidays
Thanks Bill and Aaron. Yes, in general it is OK for Gentiles to innovate secular holidays for themselves, such as celebrating a national independence day, or a special day to highlight something that is important for "yishuv olam" (improving the settled nature of society) - like Mother's Day and Father's Day to honor parents, or like Arbor Day to highlight environmental responsibility, if it's done properly (but not as an idolatrous concept of worshipping the earth, or making environmentalism into a religion).

But specifically in regard to "Earth Day," it's important to be aware that it was founded on April 22, 19'70, with the message “New Energy for a New Era” - specifically on the centenial birthday of Vladimir Lenin, who was a driving force behind the Bolshevik Russian Revolution of 1917, and who became the first dictator of the communist Soviet Union (born April 22, 18'70). In 19'90, this "Earth Day," held every year since 19'70 on 22 April, was made into a worldwide celebration.
On your insights page you happen to mention that it would be wrong to create say a Noahide holiday [for example, celebrating the receding of the Flood waters (a date mentioned in the Torah)]. I understand how this would be wrong, essentially creating a holiday that G-d did not command us to observe. There are however holidays/commemorations that the Jews celebrate which were not explicitly enjoined upon them in the Torah (Hanukkah, Purim, Ninth of Av etc as well as some local customs, fast days etc.). In Esther "the Jews undertook and irrevocably obligated THEMSELVES and their decendants, and all who might join them, to observe these two days (Purim and Shushan Purim) in the manner prescribed and at the proper time each year." Correct me if I'm wrong, but didn't this ability to commemorate "new" Jewish holidays come from the powers that G-d gave to the authentic Sanhedrin in the Torah one of which was to institute public fast days/other observances as well as declare new moons etc.? Would this mean that it would also be able to declare new Noahide holidays if it were reestablished or would a Noahide court (though I don't think Noahide courts have any such powers) be able to? Also I saw in that article (question 18(b)) that you did not mention the holiday of Sukkot as a relevant Jewish holiday for Noahides to observe (without the final day/related holiday Shemini Atzeret/Simchat Torah), from Zechariah 14 it is clear that the nations that do no fight Jerusalem in the end-of-days battle will have to observe the feast of Sukkot as a pilgramage festival to the city, should observant Noahides commemorate Sukkot today as an optional practice (without following the Jewish rest requirements during the non-Chol Hamoed days)?
klekabarraqe Wrote:On your insights page https://asknoah.org/essay/noahide-holidays
you happen to mention that it would be wrong to create say a Noahide holiday [for example, celebrating the receding of the Flood waters (a date mentioned in the Torah)]. I understand how this would be wrong, essentially creating a holiday that G-d did not command us to observe. There are however holidays/commemorations that the Jews celebrate which were not explicitly enjoined upon them in the Torah (Hanukkah, Purim, Ninth of Av etc as well as some local customs, fast days etc.). In Esther "the Jews undertook and irrevocably obligated THEMSELVES and their descendants, and all who might join them, to observe these two days (Purim and Shushan Purim) in the manner prescribed and at the proper time each year." Correct me if I'm wrong, but didn't this ability to commemorate "new" Jewish holidays come from the powers that G-d gave to the authentic Sanhedrin in the Torah one of which was to institute public fast days/other observances as well as declare new moons etc.?

This is basically correct, but it's necessary to understand that the several "new" (post-Biblical) Jewish festivals were really instituted as permitted *extensions* of one or another of the core 613 Jewish Commandments from the Five Books of Moses.

klekabarraqe Wrote:Would this mean that it [an authentic Sanhedrin] would also be able to declare new Noahide holidays if it were reestablished or would a Noahide court (though I don't think Noahide courts have any such powers) be able to?

An authentic Sanhedrin would not declare new Noahide RELIGIOUS holidays, since that would constitute a prohibited creation of new commandments.

klekabarraqe Wrote:Also I saw in that web page (question 18(b)) that you did not mention the holiday of Sukkot as a relevant Jewish holiday for Noahides to observe (without the final day/related holiday Shemini Atzeret/Simchat Torah), from Zechariah 14 it is clear that the nations that do no fight Jerusalem in the end-of-days battle will have to observe the feast of Sukkot as a pilgrimage festival to the city,

That will be a decree that comes from G-d Himself, and it is not something that we can really understand or relate to until that time occurs.

klekabarraqe Wrote:should observant Noahides commemorate Sukkot today as an optional practice (without following the Jewish rest requirements during the non-Chol Hamoed days)?

No, for the reason stated above.
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